52. Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?

52 Days.  1,248 Hours.  74,880 Minutes.

No, coconuts are non-migratory. But, people do.

We’ve covered the Empires and the Trade routes (keep in mind that there are other empires out there, but they are just not mentioned in the AP curriculum).  Trade routes are often used for trade (hence the name).  But there are two examples of peoples in this era that left home, not to trade; but to migrate.

 These are the Post-Classical Migrations…

3.1: Expansion & Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks:

There are two notable migrations.  

POLYNESIAN:  The people of Polynesia, using trial/error, ventured out across the south Pacific on a more peaceful version of Island Hopping.  They brought with them flaura/fauna (plants/animals) that transformed the islands to which they migrated.  New research posits that they even reached the east coast of South America.  This is a migration.  They didn’t travel here.  They didn’t visit here.  They MIGRATED here.  That means that they moved there and lived there and stayed there.  The best example of the Polynesian Migrations is Hawaii.  The Polynesians made it all the way to Hawaii! So, when you order a Hawaiian pizza (Ham/Pineapple), just know that the reason both pigs and pineapples (and a lot of other things) made it to Hawaii, was on a Polynesian boat.

BANTU: The Bantu Migrations are very similar to the Polynesian Migrations.  They were a west African group that migrated… (not travelled) into southern Africa.  Similar to the Polynesian migrations, the Bantu migration is evident from the impact of the spread of their language.  The Bantu language is common throughout central and southern Africa.  It even blended with arabic arriving on the east coast of Africa to create the Swahili language.  The Bantus also migrated with knowledge of irrigation and iron working to an area that was lacking in both. 

Tomorrow, we look at the impact of the movements of Post Classical Peoples.

Posted on March 21, 2016 .