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Along with all of those goods and technologies, there are serious ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES that accompany the NETWORKS OF EXCHANGE (1200-1450). For the College Board, This means foods and diseases. They specifically site Bananas, Champa Rice (a fast growing rice that can grow two full crops per season, which was a tribute from Vietnam to Song China), and citrus fruits (which means lemons, sour oranges, and pomelos (since the Mediterranean already had other citrus fruits as evidenced by seeds at Pompeii and other sources). Another environmental consequence is disease. When the world connects, it creates highways for trade and the spreading of disease. Below are the ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES of the NETWORKS OF EXCHANGE.

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Below are the specific KEY CONCEPTS that apply to this sub-unit:

A deepening and widening of networks of human interaction within and across regions contributed to cultural, technological, and biological diffusion within and between various societies.

A deepening and widening of networks of human interaction within and across regions contributed to cultural, technological, and biological diffusion within and between various societies.

  • Improved commercial practices led to an increased volume of trade and expanded the geographical range of existing trade routes—including the Silk Roads, trans-Saharan trade network, and Indian Ocean

  • The growth of inter-regional trade in luxury goods was encouraged by innovations in previously existing transportation and commercial technologies, including the caravanserai, forms of credit, and the development of money economies as well as the use of the compass, the astrolabe and larger ship designs.

  • The economy of Song China flourished as a result of increased productive capacity, expanding trade networks, and innovations in agriculture and manufacturing.

  • The expansion of empires—including the Mongols—facilitated Afro-Eurasian trade and communication as new people were drawn into their conquerors’ economies and trade networks.

  • Increased cross-cultural interactions resulted in the diffusion of literary, artistic, and cultural traditions, as well as scientific and technological innovation.

  • There was continued diffusion of crops and pathogens, with epidemic diseases, including the bubonic plague, along trade routes.

Changes in trade networks resulted from and stimulated increasing productive capacity, with important implications for social and gender structures and environmental processes.

Changes in trade networks resulted from and stimulated increasing productive capacity, with important implications for social and gender structures and environmental processes.

  • The fate of cities varied greatly, with periods of significant decline and periods of increased urbanization buoyed by rising productivity and expanding trade networks.


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CLIP #1: DISEASE! (from CRASH COURSE World History)

CLIP #2: HISTORY of the BANANA (from NATGEO)

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1. The Decameron, 1353 CE, Giovanni Boccaccio (FLORENCE, ITALY)
2. Qu’ran, Surah al-Waqi’ah, 632 CE, Muhammad (PBUH) (Muhammad PBUH mentions that Bananas are one of the fruits in Heaven), (MECCA/MEDINA)
3. Ad Seipsum, 1349 CE, Petrarch (ITALY)
4.
5.

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1. These new Networks of Exchange also delivered natural things (plants, diseases).
2. Disease is obvious but check that map real quick… Look how fast the plague spread.
3. Most of the foods they mention (bananas, citrus) originate in SE Asia.
4. These foods slowly move from Oceania to SE Asia, but quickly move across Afro-Eurasia with the advent of Islam and Islamic Merchants in the Indian Ocean Trade.
5. There are Bananas in heaven. Muhammad (PBUH) said so.